Tuesday, August 08, 2006

Bridge Blockade Cuts Off Access To Kalmiopsis Logging Site



Update [10:11 am]: Word has that law enforcement will soon begin an attempt to "extract" or remove this person from the platform.

Early this morning, people defending the Kalmiopsis region from logging set up a blockade on a bridge. They say the blockade is a structure called a cantilever. This seems to entail a log that is lashed across the bridge and extending over the river which is a good distance below. A person is suspended from the end of the log on a hanging platform. This puts them out of reach of law enforcement for now. If the blockade is tampered with it could collapse.

The following quote is not credited to anyone but is at the end of the linked article.

"This assault on our public lands is a disaster for the forest, a taxpayer rip off and it's against the will of the vast majority of the American people. It is the result of a broken democracy and I am taking this action today to jumpstart the system of checks and balances that is supposed to protect us from the tyranny of an authoritarian government so this doesn't happen again."
------------------------------------------------

Here's the full press release.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE August 8th, 2006

CONTACT: Laurel Sutherlin, (541) 659-2917
Ginger Cassady, (415) 640-7155

RESISTANCE TO ROADLESS LOGGING ESCALATES AS PROTESTORS BLOCKADE BRIDGE LEADING TO THE NATION'S FIRST ROADLESS AREA TIMBER SALE

Early this morning, protestors erected a daring road blockade to halt logging at the Mike's Gulch Timber Sale in the Siskiyou National Forest, site of the first ever incursion into an Inventoried Roadless Area since the passage of the federal Roadless Rule in 2001. At least one activist is suspended in a cantilever off the side of the Green Bridge above the Illinois River in a manner that prohibits traffic across the bridge without endangering the life of the person hanging from it.

This dramatic action follows years of lawsuits, rallies, public comment periods and national media attention involving tens of thousands of people speaking out against the logging of the Biscuit. Over 2 million people submitted comments to protect our nation's roadless areas before the Biscuit fire and over 20,000 citizens submitted public comments opposing the Biscuit logging when it was proposed, and almost 100 arrests have been made of people engaging in nonviolent civil disobedience protesting the massive logging project.

The Governors of Oregon, California, Washington and New Mexico are
currently suing the Bush Administration to retain roadless area
protections and an injunction meant to halt the Biscuit logging in
particular has been filed but has not yet been ruled on by a federal court.

The public process that lead to the creation of the Roadless Rule, which protected almost sixty million acres of the most wild and pristine public lands remaining in the United States from destructive practices like logging and mining, involved more citizen input than any other piece of federal policy on any issue in the history of this country. Despite this overwhelming public support for protection of roadless areas, the Bush Administration has aggressively pursued stripping the protections it provides by opening these areas up to massive commercial timber harvest.

"This assault on our public lands is a disaster for the forest, a taxpayer rip off and it's against the will of the vast majority of the American people. It is the result of a broken democracy and I am taking this action today to jumpstart the system of checks and balances that is supposed to protect us from the tyranny of an authoritarian government so this doesn't happen again."

PHOTOS AVAILABLE AT: http://usaphoto.greenpeace.org/Roadless_Rule/

8 Comments:

At 8/08/2006 11:53:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Who will protect us from the tyranny of an authoritarian moderator?

 
At 8/08/2006 12:33:00 PM, Blogger noel adamson said...

Our government was never all that democratic or it might have survived and survived as a world leading democracy. Even the Revolution, a war for "independence" not "freedom", was fought by slave owners and those they grudgingly got on board with promise of relief from oppression such as that inflicted by the British. Britain had set a legal precedent in 1775 allowing a slave to sue his master that heralded the beginning of the end of slavery in the British Empire. The British system was fascism though I don't think that name was invented until Mussolini's party used it. Fascism means a merger of government and big business and invariably leads to legalized plunder. Check oil company profits and prices at the pump and watch them continue to rise as they monopolize more and more of that resource.

I have long opposed such activities as blocking a bridge but now believe there is no legal recourse in a system that is fascist by definition and practice especially after witnessing "trials" of environmentalists here in Humboldt County and seeing the stacking of the Supreme Court with corporate lawyers. That's not to mention seeing the destruction of the last of the ancient Redwoods and last of the “wild” lands. The last conservative in the Republican party was Teddy Roosevelt who wanted to conserve wilderness and began setting aside tracts of land to do so, and fought fascism in other ways. His slogan “Talk softly and carry a big stick” was in reference to dealing with giant robber baron corporations who were usurping what democracy we had with their economic power and inherent avarice. Soon after that they comandeered the Republican party with the support of such entities as the KKK and began looting the stock market with "deregulation" culminating in the crash of 1929.

It is entirely appropriate for a blog owner to exercise dictatorial control over their private blog just as it is appropriate for a business to exercise such control over it's operations. But not our government. We have a right to defend our government against any such attempt with any means necessary. It is to the credit of these obstructionists that they are blocking a bridge, unarmed and willing to suffer severe consequences to defend our democracy and our environment.

Sorry for being so long winded. Comments like that of “anonymous” just set me off otherwise I just want to express my support of the activities in Oregon and say thank you

 
At 8/08/2006 02:31:00 PM, Blogger saf said...

No reason to apologize Noel, thanks for your analysis.

 
At 8/08/2006 02:53:00 PM, Blogger saf said...

Disturbing the recovery of the biscuit fire area does nothing to prevent the real threats posed to humans by bad forest management of the past.

Most if not all of this logging is done in areas nowhere near human habitation.

Real fuel reduction means thinning out the overcrowded areas that have not yet burned. And doing so in and around where people live, not in wildernesses.

Tree plantations like the ones being created by the Forest (dis)Service are fire hazards themselves.

Thinning out the young-growth while retaining the overstory (big trees) is the real solution, not the clearcutting of burned over areas. This is known as a "shaded fuel break". The only reason to take the big trees is profit for the companies, causing a loss to the public.

There are ways to fund fuel reduction projects without taking the big fire-resistant trees. Sometimes this can be done with grants.

 
At 8/09/2006 09:54:00 AM, Blogger Derchoadus said...

Soooo....Cut down a tree to save trees from being cut down?

D'oH!

 
At 8/15/2006 09:26:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

They are just trees, and they grow back. Why don't you people worry about real problems and become productive members of society instead of trying to stop proven methods of managing forests.

 
At 8/16/2006 12:10:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Proven methods of managing forests does not a healthy environment make. But is sure turns a gigantic profit for Charles Hurwitz.

 
At 8/16/2006 07:27:00 PM, Blogger saf said...

Proven to who?

I promote the methods of forestry that are proven to me to be responsible and sustainable and criticize the methods that I've seen are damaging and irresponsible.

Some of the real problems that I worry about are:

Loss of healthy salmon runs.

Loss of healthy rivers and streams.

Extinction of species.

The loss of potential new medicines derived from yet-undiscovered plants and fungi.

All of which constitutes major damage to the natural ability of this region to sustain human life.

 

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